Making the Grade

This year's freshman class set new academic records.

Recruiting promising students and giving them the tools to persist and graduate underscores the mission of the Office of Enrollment Management (OEM).

To achieve this mission requires the collaborative efforts of many individuals, faculty and staff throughout the IU Bloomington campus. It is because of their dedication that the OEM met its enrollment target this year; provided high-touch student support services through the newly opened Student Central; and helped to ensure students graduated prepared and ready for the 21st century workforce.


“Sometimes you only get one opportunity in life, so you have to take advantage when it happens and learn from those experiences. IU has given me so many opportunities to grow and prove to myself that I can succeed when I put forth the hard work and effort.”

– Marquez Carlisle
IU Senior & Cox Legacy Scholar Recipient

A Place to Belong and Grow

Marquez Carlisle is committed to doing whatever it takes to realize his dream of higher education. As the first in his family to attend college, Carlisle says he’s never been afraid of hard work because the end goal – a college diploma – is the ultimate prize.

“College opens doors that might otherwise remain closed. Growing up, we didn’t have much. This gave me the drive to succeed in school so that I could create a better future for myself,” Carlisle says.

Carlisle, 22, is well on his way to making his goals a reality – and IU is helping by providing the academic and social experiences to help him get there. Now a senior, Carlisle is a double major in African American & Diaspora Studies and Pre-Law; he maintains a 3.6 GPA. Once he graduates, Carlisle plans to apply to law school.

In addition to his studies, Carlisle has worked part time at the IU Recreational Center during the school year and for Amazon.com in the summer. From the money he’s earned, Carlisle purchased a small rental property in Indianapolis that he rehabbed and now rents out. The income helps pay for school.

Carlisle’s hard work and determination are paying off. As a sophomore, he received the prestigious Cox Legacy Scholarship.

“That was the defining moment in my college career; the scholarship made all the difference for me, because I could focus on grades and not worry about coming up with the money to pay for school,” Carlisle says.

As part of his IU experience, Carlisle is deeply involved in giving back to the local community. He works with several youth-serving agencies, including the Boys and Girls Club, the YMCA, and Big Brother programs.

According to Carlisle, one of his most rewarding community service projects involved serving as a little league basketball coach. More than a coach, Carlisle became a mentor to the young children, showing them by example that the path to college can lead to a brighter future.

“The little kids looked up to me and I knew that what I was saying – whether it was about college or something else – had an impact," Carlisle recalls.

David B Johnson

Building Our Future, One Student at a Time

Our theme for this 2013 Overview, Today’s Students, Tomorrow’s Leaders, illustrates how the collaborative work being done by the Office of Enrollment Management (OEM) and the IU Bloomington campus is indeed making a difference for our students and the soon-to-be future leaders. These efforts have taken many shapes and forms – from providing financial resources through the Office of Scholarships to help students persist and graduate to developing a new recruiting program that introduces high school students from underrepresented minority groups to college life at IU.

As we look back at 2013, technological, demographic and economic forces have created new challenges for higher education. In OEM, we are facing these challenges head on, forging new partnerships, programs and investments that enable us to better meet the needs of a growing and changing student population. As a result of these and other initiatives, new academic milestones were achieved in 2013, with this year’s first-year students the most academically accomplished on record and one of the largest and most diverse classes to enroll on the Bloomington campus.

After much planning, best practices research, and cross-training of staff, Student Central opened its doors in February 2013. It now serves as a key focal point of service for students, providing quality support and enhanced service for registration, transcripts, records and financial aid assistance.

Moving forward, OEM will continue the collaborative work that we have already begun with our campus colleagues. As part of this work, we intend to investigate the potential of a new admissions space that will better incorporate presentation and meeting room technologies, while also enabling us to deliver an important message to prospective students and families about the value IU offers in helping them prepare for their careers.

Finally, our future goals will include a focus on expanding and refining the use of data to drive strategic recruiting and admissions decisions; exploring the idea of financial aid programs for middle-income families and students to keep IU affordable for Indiana residents; and, perhaps most important, working with our campus partners to clearly define the IU undergraduate experience as we help educate today’s students and tomorrow’s leaders.

All of this could not be done without the tireless efforts of OEM staff and our collaboration with numerous partners. I would like to thank each and every one of these individuals for their dedication. Together, we are proud to share in our commitment of truly making a difference for our students.

— David B. Johnson
Vice Provost, Enrollment Management

Professor Kristi Montooth

The Importance of Faculty to Student Success

College is a time of self discovery – an opportunity for students to cultivate their potential as faculty guide and challenge them along the way. In the process, students and professors alike discover – and rediscover – the joy of learning.

That joy of learning comes naturally to Kristi Montooth. An assistant professor in the College of Arts and Sciences' Department of Biology at IU Bloomington, Montooth (pictured above) views her lab and the research that she and her students conduct there as a window on the future.

More than a professor, Montooth is a mentor to many of her students. She has designed her lab to encourage students’ innate inquisitiveness so that these budding scientists in training can “think freely.”

“To me, teaching isn’t delivering content in a lecture format,” says Montooth. “Teaching science and conducting research is a journey of exploration. I want to make sure my students are truly learning in class and outside of class, so that they come away with a new appreciation of the world around them and a desire to learn more.”

Serving Students

Serving Students

“Students first” is the mission of every OEM staff member.

A commitment to student-centered services, partnership building, strategic recruiting and college-access programs for students from underrepresented minority groups is evident throughout the nine different departments that form the backbone of the Office of Enrollment Management (OEM) and the 180 employees who share a common goal of supporting academic excellence.


“I work with students and families, helping them understand any issues that relate to their financial aid, registration or transcripts. My background is in education, which is why I love what I do because I feel like I am teaching students every day. I look at every student as an individual; any issues that student has are unique, and it’s my job to figure out the resolution. Financial aid can be pretty complicated; it’s like solving a mystery. For me, it’s awesome when students say they understand how financial aid works because of something I’ve explained to them.”


Student Central

Support Is Key to Putting Students First

“I work with students and families, helping them understand any issues that relate to their financial aid, registration or transcripts. My background is in education, which is why I love what I do because I feel like I am teaching students every day. I look at every student as an individual; any issues that student has are unique, and it’s my job to figure out the resolution. Financial aid can be pretty complicated; it’s like solving a mystery. For me, it’s awesome when students say they understand how financial aid works because of something I’ve explained to them.”

— Lisa Hamilton, Record Services Coordinator, Student Central

Visit Student Central

A Heart for Service

A Heart for Service

For Dot Kemp (pictured above left), the Student Central center on IU Bloomington’s campus is much more than a building where students turn to for financial aid or registration issues. Kemp, who has worked at IU for 28 years, refers to Student Central as a “special place of caring people who are there for students and families in every sense of the word.”

When the new Student Central opened its doors in 2013, the idea was to create a centralized “student hub” that combined the customer service operations of the offices of the Registrar and Student Financial Assistance into a centralized point of service for registration, transcripts, records and financial aid assistance. As part of the shared-services model – and a key component of the Office of Enrollment Management’s goal to increase customer service and reduce operating costs through increased efficiency – staff members are cross trained in several areas. The end result: better service and support for students.

Improved efficiency is further realized by Student Central's customer queuing software, which enables students to spend less time standing in line or waiting to meet with a specific individual.

But it’s the people who work at Student Central – and the assistance they provide – who make the real difference.

In some instances, that assistance has little to do with registration or financial aid. Instead, it’s offering compassion when the unexpected happens. Kemp recalls a student who had cancer and needed to return home to Indianapolis. Kemp and other staff at Student Central quickly orchestrated the student’s transition to the IUPUI campus and her eventual return to Bloomington.

“For us, it’s more than answering questions; it’s truly caring about the students we serve,” Kemp says. “All of us here have a heart for service and are committed to doing whatever we can to help students with any issues they bring us.”


“All of us here have a heart for service and are committed to doing whatever we can to help students with any issues they bring us."

— Dot Kemp,
Senior Assistant Director Student Central

Sunflower

A New Beginning... at IU

Coordinated by the Office of First Year Experience and campus partners, IUBeginnings is a freshman orientation program – but with a twist. When students arrive on the IU Bloomington campus, they can opt to journey into a new realm of academic and co-curricular opportunities – from whitewater rafting in the Appalachian Mountains to networking with employers in Chicago. During these experiences, students learn about issues affecting new students at IU and, in turn, share a unique bonding with other students, as well as a boost in confidence to begin the first year of college life.

Accomplishments

2012-13 Academic Year

36,711 Prospective Students and Families Hosted

1,600+ Recruiting Events Held

174,238 Freshman Application Documents Processed

17,586 Undergraduates Received Financial Aid

$176,590,199 in Gift Financial Aid Awarded

103,000 Student Enrollments Processed

71,000+ Classes Scheduled

1,358 Student Data Operational Research Reports Produced

17,758 Participants in New Student Orientation

91% of Hoosier Link Cohort Transfer to IU Bloomington

20 Social Media Platforms Maintained

The Power of One

The Power of One

Volunteers make a difference for future generations.

From serving as volunteer recruiters, to offering career advice, to mentoring, to leading regional IU alumni chapters, the men and women who make up IU’s alumni family are ambassadors for new generations of students and instrumental in shaping IU’s future.

Ambassadors for the Future

Ambassadors for the Future

Indiana University alumni are passionate about their alma mater – just ask 1990 IU graduate Gretchen Mueller.

“Indiana University is in my blood. My parents were very involved in IU, and my father was a member of the IU Alumni Association Executive Council. It was ingrained into me at an early age that you didn’t just walk away from your school once you graduated. You stayed in touch,” Gretchen says.

Gretchen and her husband, Tom, (pictured above) cemented their connections to IU through the Houston Chapter of the Indiana University Alumni Association. Tom is a former Chapter president, and Gretchen served as a student recruiting chairperson. In 2001, the couple moved to Seattle where they became involved in the Seattle IU Alumni Chapter.

Alumni volunteers like the Muellers assist IU in several ways. Some serve as “IU ambassadors,” attending and speaking about the IU experience at college recruiting fairs. The interaction with prospective IU students at these gatherings typically entails answering a gamut of questions on everything from what life is like in Indiana, to majors, to schools of study and, of course, IU basketball, according to Gretchen.

“It’s a reciprocal relationship for volunteer recruiters and students alike,” Gretchen says. “We get to work with and train other alums, learn what young people think, share our experiences about IU with others and be part of helping to bring great students to a great university. It’s an amazing experience,” Gretchen says.


“I work with the Multicultural Outreach Recruitment Educators (M.O.R.E), which tries to bring students of diverse backgrounds to IU. I am here at IU because of M.O.R.E., so it’s important for me to give back. As a first-generation student, it’s a powerful experience to speak with others like myself, tell them how IU has opened doors for me and how it can do the same for them.”

--Angelica Smith, IU Sophomore

Leading by Example

“I work with the Multicultural Outreach Recruitment Educators (M.O.R.E), which tries to bring students of diverse backgrounds to IU. I am here at IU because of M.O.R.E., so it’s important for me to give back. As a first-generation student, it’s a powerful experience to speak with others like myself, tell them how IU has opened doors for me and how it can do the same for them.”

— Angelica Smith
IU Sophomore


“I remember speaking to several exchange students from China at an IU recruiting event. I told one young man that I was impressed by how much courage it must have taken to leave his family, his homeland, come to the United States and sight unseen choose a school like IU in the heartland of America. To see the excitement in his eyes when he explained his choice was an awesome experience and made me proud to represent my university.”

— Gretchen Mueller
1990 IU Alum and Volunteer Student Recruiter


Learn More About Being a Volunteer
Dream

Dream Makers

A college scholarship can change the course of a student’s future.

Indiana University is committed to making higher education accessible and affordable so that promising students can pursue their college dreams. Through the IU Office of Scholarships, we help hundreds of young men and women every year by providing scholarship opportunities based on academic merit and/or financial need. Just as important is private sector support; for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2012, 26 percent of private giving went toward student scholarships and financial aid.

First in Her Family

First in Her Family

Heidi Williams, 18, knew early on that a college education was her ticket to a better future. Growing up, she saw her parents struggle to find meaningful employment because they both lacked a college diploma. Williams says she had bigger dreams, and a college degree is going to help make those dreams happen.

“Sometimes it is a lot of pressure when you’re the first in your family to attend college; you know people are counting on you to get that degree. But I’ve always enjoyed hard work; going to class or doing my homework has never been an obligation for me. My goal is to find a job I am passionate about and a career where I can make a difference. A college education will help me get there,” Williams says.

For many first-generation college students, finding the tools, resources and self-confidence to envision higher education as part of their future can be challenging. If they have questions, they typically cannot go to their parents for answers because they lack the life experiences to help.

IU has made the transition to college life easier for Williams. Through The Groups Scholars Program – an effort that provides first-generation college students with academic, financial and emotional support even before students arrive on campus up until they graduate – Williams found the support system she needed.

“After completing a six-week program in the summer, I felt more connected to the campus when I began my classes,” Williams explains. “Through the program, I also began working as a research assistant in the Social Psychology lab on campus.”

Williams plans to double major in microbiology and psychology. One day, she hopes to attend graduate school and, later, pursue a career in research or teaching.

“I’ve seen how hard it’s been on my parents not having a college degree. Yes, sometimes it is difficult knowing I can’t go to them with questions about college. But it’s also encouraged me to try all that much harder,” Williams says.

The Impact of Giving

The Impact of Giving

“I give to IU because I want students to know there is someone who really backs them, someone who wants them to do well. I think that is invaluable to a young person.”

— Aishah Hasnie
2006 IU Graduate

Guide to Giving